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Google Webmaster Tools New Features October 7, 2010

Posted by Daniel in Search Engines, SEO, WebApps, WebStuff.
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Surprise! Google’s adding stuff to Webmaster Tools. Apparently they’ve discovered that we (SEO type people) have to find other tools and software to track changes and run the numbers on percentages and increases, etc., and would rather us spend our time in a Google product. I’m ok with that.

Google Webmaster Tools Updates

The updates involve tracking the change in amount of impressions and clicks and the change in rankings for each keyword and can be found in “Your Site on the Web” under Search Queries. It doesn’t replace my rank tracking software or some good digging in Google Analytics, but it definitely helps me see more information at a glance about each keyword. Thanks for the early Christmas present Google.

Twitter Updates Authorization Rules and URL Shortener September 2, 2010

Posted by Daniel in SEO, WebApps, WebStuff.
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Twitter Link Wrapping Service t.co

I got an email from Twitter this morning letting me know that the millions of apps that access and update the Twitter API will no longer be doing so via a request for your password. Instead they’ll use a new form of authorization called “OAuth” – which will still request your permission (more…)

Instant Updates Almost Meant Instant Security Issue May 11, 2010

Posted by Daniel in WebApps, WebStuff.
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protect your personal informationPersonal and private information is becoming less and less personal and private. But with permissions settings and personalization, we don’t seem to mind sharing our info as long as it is protected within our network or among our friends.

The almighty Facebook – the entity responsible for guarding our private and personal contact information, profile photos, and network affiliations – almost shattered this sense of security. Jason Kincaid reports that a security hole in the new instant personalization partnership between Yelp and Facebook, opened up any facebook user to instant personal information sharing. (more…)

Facebook Returns Stolen Name January 23, 2010

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Funny Facebook

Just a quick update for some of you that might have heard that Facebook commandeered a user’s vanity landing page  (/harmon). After much outcry produced by TechCrunch on the issue surrounding the handing over of the landing page url to Harman International, Facebook sent TechCrunch and Harman Bajwa… (more…)

The City as a Chalkboard – There’s an App for That January 8, 2010

Posted by Daniel in Search Engines, SEO, WebApps.
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BlockChalk is a new piece of fun for your phone that lets you “write” in chalk all over your city, town, neighborhood, favorite restaurant, etc. How will this affect search you might ask? It’ll only be a matter of time until Google (more…)

New Google Sidewiki: Will it Stay or Will it Go? October 24, 2009

Posted by Daniel in Search Engines, SEO, WebApps, WebStuff.
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Although I’m sure you’ve already heard by now the news about Google’s newest toolbar-gadget the Side-Wiki (even Bruce Clay briefly mentioned something about it), I thought I’d make a quick reference to a feature webmasters/site owners should get to first just in case people actually start using it.  As the site owner, you can post a note about your site that stays on top of all other notes.  An algorithm similar to Google’s current search algorithm will be used to rank the listing of the rest of the notes people post. Take advantage of your site ownership, and use this space to communicate the heart of your business. Make it a little more personal, as a note should be. This isn’t the place for sales pitches. I can almost guarantee that a sales pitch posted in the owner’s note will drive away some visitors. While your checking it out – post your impressions on the Side-Wiki of the HireAHelper local movers landing page.

Two More Reasons Apple is Overrated September 19, 2009

Posted by Daniel in WebApps, WebStuff.
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A follow up to the Top 10 reasons Apple is Overrated

Reason number 11

A claim by security expert Charlie Miller that “Snow Leopard’s more secure than [previous release] Leopard, but it’s not as secure as Vista or Windows 7.”

Interesting when one of the loudest horns Apple keeps tooting is their resilience against virus’ and spy-ware.

Address space layout randomization (ASLR) is the key difference Miller points to.  Vista upgraded their version of this random memory placement tool, but Apple has ignored Vista’s updates and made none of their own.

Charlie says that Macs get hacked less, but not because they’re harder to get into, but simply because there are significantly less out there than there are PCs.  He says “That’s because if [the hacker] can hit 90 per cent of the machines out there, that’s all he’s gonna do. It’s not worth him nearly doubling his work just to get that last 10 per cent.”

So Apple’s claim to security fame… not so impressive.

Reason number 12

Apple has been lying to the FCC – a federal offense.

Image representing Google as depicted in Crunc...

Image via CrunchBase

Ok so I know it’s not a technical reason, but still. Apple has rejected (or according to Apple, is still pondering over) the Google Voice app. Apple has been denying this rejection but Google recently submitted a letter to the FCC stating that they have screenshots documenting the rejection.

But Apple won’t back down and in a recent letter to the FCC still says they have “not rejected the Google Voice application and we continue to discuss it with Google.”

Apple lists in that letter that Google Voice falls in the same category as 3 other third party GV apps.  Those apps strangely enough have all been removed from the app store.  In fact, the company behind one app sent a screenshot confirming their rejection from the app store to Tech Crunch. So why would Apple categorize Google Voice with other rejected apps if GV wasn’t rejected, but merely “under consideration.”

Lying to the FCC – there’s an app for that.

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